Conflict at Columbia

JoinConversation

Connect

 

facebook2

 

twitter2

 

linkedin2


 

AC4Link logoAC4 Link features information about faculty, centers, and departments across the Columbia University community who are working directly or indirectly in the areas of conflict resolution, violence prevention, peace, and sustainable development.

Profiles are organized by topical area, academic discipline, and Columbia University school and include summaries of relevant projects, papers, and courses, as well as contact information.

 

Featured Faculty Profile

 

Professor Sarah Cleveland is a noted expert in international law and the constitutional law of U.S. foreign relations, with particular interests in the status of international law in U.S. domestic law, international humanitarian law, human rights law, and the constitutional law of U.S. foreign relations. From 2009 to 2011, she served as the Counselor on International Law to the Legal Adviser at the U.S. Department of State, where she supervised the office’s legal work relating to the law of war, counterterrorism, and Afghanistan and Pakistan, and assisted with its international human rights and international justice work.

[Learn More]

Featured Center Profile

 

The Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma, a project of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, is dedicated to informed, innovative and ethical news reporting on violence, conflict and tragedy. Whether the topic is street crime, family violence, natural disaster, war or human rights, effective news reporting on traumatic events demands knowledge, skill and support. The Dart Center provides journalists around the world with the resources necessary to meet this challenge, drawing on a global, interdisciplinary network of news professionals, mental health experts, educators and researchers.

[Learn More]



 

Our Partners

 

NECRlogoColumbia’s master’s program in Negotiation and Conflict Resolution, which can be completed on a part-time or full-time basis, combines theory and applied training to prepare students to develop practical models for negotiating and resolving disputes among parties with differing objectives and desires. This graduate program is part of a rich history of conflict resolution at Columbia University. The graduate program’s training philosophy is grounded in a commitment to interactive, dialogue-based methods of managing and resolving conflict. The focus is on building common ground, establishing dialogue, applying practical skills, ensuring representation and recognition, and forging relationships.

 

 

 

ICCCR-Logo-mediumThe Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR) is an innovative center committed to developing knowledge and practice to promote constructive conflict resolution, effective cooperation, and social justice. We partner with individuals, groups, organizations, and communities to create tools and environments through which conflicts can be resolved constructively and just and peaceful relationships can thrive. We work with sensitivity to cultural differences and emphasize the links between theory, research, and practice. While many conflict resolution  centers provide training and consulting, our practice is rooted in our own original, leading-edge scholarship.