2011 Graduate Fellows

AC4’s 2010-2011 Graduate Student Fellowship Cohort

Individual Fellowship Recipients

Picture of Jonathan Chang - Fellowship 2010-11Jonathan Chang
School of Continuing Education
Negotiation and Conflict Resolution

As an AC4 fellow, Jonathan examined the lives of the Rwanda Genocide survivors and refugees. He tested the hypothesis that promoting social entrepreneurship through business and leadership training aimed at university students (i.e., the future leaders) could be used as a tool for conflict resolution.

Picture of Juliette de Wolfe - Fellowship 2010-11Juliette de Wolfe
Teachers College
Anthropology and Education

As an AC4 fellow, Juliette’s project took an interdisciplinary approach to research, incorporating the study of conflict, the acquired knowledge of special education, disability issues and rights, neurodevelopment understanding, and a biomedical approach to illness narratives, all while using an ethnographic lens to document lived experiences of people in natural settings. Specifically, she examined how members of a support group for parents of children with autism experience and overcome autism-specific issues that concern interpersonal and institutional conflicts.

Picture of Sarah Flatto - Fellowship 2010-11Sarah Flatto
Teachers College
International and Transcultural Studies

As an AC4 fellow, Sarah’s fieldwork examined the nexus of peace-building and human development in South Asia, particularly educational policy planning and incentives for violence prevention. She sought to clarify the complex links between protracted conflict, cross-sectoral cooperation, and human security.

Picture of Alon Hillel-Tuch - Fellowship 2010-11Alon Hillel-Tuch
School of Continuing Education
Negotiation and Conflict Resolution

As an AC4 fellow, Alon developed systems that create collaborative practice within an online genocide prevention network. The fellowship built on a series of trainings of state officials done originally at the Center for International Conflict Resolution (CICR). The fellowship provided Alon with the means to develop and contribute to the core of the online network that the Engaging Governments in Genocide Prevention (EGGP) project is seeking to create. The online network project is the product of a collaboration between AC4 and the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution (ICAR).

Picture of Michelle Jackson - Fellowship 2010-11Michelle Jackson
School of Continuing Education
Negotiation and Conflict Resolution

As an AC4 fellow, Michelle’s research focused on food systems with a particular focus on Harlem’s designation as a food desert, an area lacking in access to healthy food. Combining her interests in design thinking and conflict resolution, she participated in the cooperative development of a sustainable neighborhood network that creates dialogue around Harlem’s food system in visual and experiential ways. In a field such as conflict resolution, where there is an emphasis on the importance of trying to understand differing points of view, creative experiential communication can add another perspective to the dialogue. Her project aimed to create new understandings of systems and relationships in complex situations.

Picture of Huma Kidwai - Fellowship 2010-11Huma Kidwai
Teachers College
International Educational Development

As an AC4 fellow, Huma explored how early-adolescent madrassa students in India respond to and cope with the stereotype threat associated with madrassas. Additionally, her study aimed at understanding the environment within which students become aware of such stereotypes about them.

Picture of Hau Man (Phoebe) Leung - Fellowship 2010-11Hau Man (Phoebe) Leung
School of International and Public Affairs
Public Administration in Development Practice

As an AC4 fellow, Phoebe explored linkages between livelihoods opportunities and conflict resolution among Burmese refugees and their supporting agencies in Thailand.

Picture of Meera Pathmarajah - Fellowship 2010-11Meera Pathmarajah
Teachers College
International Educational Development

As an AC4 fellow, Meera investigated the aspirations of Sri Lankan university students in Tamil Nadu with respect to their perceived role in post-conflict development in Sri Lanka.

Picture of Cody Pope - Fellowship 2010-11Cody Pope
School of International and Public Affairs
International Security Policy and Conflict Resolution

As an AC4 fellow, Cody’s research focused on foreign investment in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The project assessed the role of direct and indirect foreign investment on the livelihoods and lifestyles of the Congolese living or working near the mining regions in the east and south-east. With a focus on the impact of global policies on local Congolese populations, the project strove to inform investors, national governments, and consumers on the impact of their policies and decisions.

Picture of Ashley Rossi - Fellowship 2010-11Ashley Rossi
School of Continuing Education
Negotiation and Conflict Resolution

As an AC4 fellow, Ashley’s capstone project examined Turkey’s gender dynamics, specifically how women navigate the dichotomy of personal democracy within a religiously conservative state. She produced a media campaign, including web based content and a documentary film, in an effort to collect data, raise awareness and test the limitations of media as a tool for transforming conflict.

Picture of Amina Tawasil - Fellowship 2010-11Amina Tawasil
Teachers College
Anthropology and Education

As an AC4 fellow, Amina conducted her dissertation research on students of the women’s seminaries of Iran.

Team Fellowship Recipients

Picture of Maria Wang, Jessemin Sheyda-Losick, & Monica Mekaru (Left to Right) - Fellowship 2010-11 Team Recipients

Monica Mekaru, Jessemin Sheyda-Losick, and Maria Wang
School of International and Public Affairs
Public Administration in Development Practice

As AC4 fellows, Maria, Jessemin, and Monica (pictured from left to right) contributed to the preparation of a Zambezi Valley Development Study for a Brazilian mining company and the Mozambican Government. The objective of their AC4-funded research project was to identify and adapt existing best practices in sustainable development within the extractive industry in the Brazilian Amazon. They applied their diverse skills sets to minimize the potential conflicts between local communities, governments and mining companies, and maximize the contribution of extractive investments to local sustainable development.